Titled vs. Entitled

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What´s the difference between "titled" and "entitled"?

Titled vs. Entitled

"Titled" refers to the name of a book, play, etc. "Entitled" means a right or a claim.

Please refer to page 2 in the section titled "How to Contact Us."
As the sole heir, you are entitled to the entire estate.

   

Comments

10/15/2006 9:02:03 AM
Aisha said:

many authors write:"that is why Kant entitled the discussion of these duties,"the doctrine of ethics".So is the use of the word entitled correct here.


9/9/2009 2:37:44 AM
Michael said:

According to Merriam-Webster & Oxford titled and entitled are both correct when making reference to the name of a book, play, etc.


11/12/2011 8:06:50 AM
michael bouwman said:

With respect, this is an Americanisation (as is commonly, the converting of a noun into a verb, by adding 'ing' onto it, even when no verb from of the noun exists). In the UK and its past and present colonies, it is the other way around. In Australia, I have always known the verb 'entitled' as meaning, 'to have the title'. Many American modifications to English involves the erasure of anything French (so 'colour' becomes 'color'). The dropping of the 'en' from 'entitled' is just another example. However, usage in America, is becoming adopted elsewhere ad hoc, so in as far as English is a living language, both 'entitled' and 'titled' are acceptable, but the latter is more recent. For some of us, the French influence on English is still a guilty pleasure. I suspect in the USA, it is an annoyance ;)


11/13/2011 4:15:32 PM
michael bouwman said:

With respect, this is an Americanisation (as is commonly, the converting of a noun into a verb, by adding 'ing' onto it, even when no verb from of the noun exists). In the UK and its past and present colonies, it is the other way around. In Australia, I have always known the verb 'entitled' as meaning, 'to have the title'. Many American modifications to English involves the erasure of anything French (so 'colour' becomes 'color'). The dropping of the 'en' from 'entitled' is just another example. However, usage in America, is becoming adopted elsewhere ad hoc, so in as far as English is a living language, both 'entitled' and 'titled' are acceptable, but the latter is more recent. For some of us, the French influence on English is still a guilty pleasure. I suspect in the USA, it is an annoyance ;)


11/13/2011 4:15:49 PM
michael bouwman said:

With respect, this is an Americanisation (as is commonly, the converting of a noun into a verb, by adding 'ing' onto it, even when no verb from of the noun exists). In the UK and its past and present colonies, it is the other way around. In Australia, I have always known the verb 'entitled' as meaning, 'to have the title'. Many American modifications to English involves the erasure of anything French (so 'colour' becomes 'color'). The dropping of the 'en' from 'entitled' is just another example. However, usage in America, is becoming adopted elsewhere ad hoc, so in as far as English is a living language, both 'entitled' and 'titled' are acceptable, but the latter is more recent. For some of us, the French influence on English is still a guilty pleasure. I suspect in the USA, it is an annoyance ;)




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